Workers demanded an increase in the minimum wage, among other things, in New York City in May 2014.

Workers demanded an increase in the minimum wage, among other things, in New York City in May 2014.

The politics around New York City car washes are heating up. City Council recently passed a law that requires car wash owners to be licensed every two years, meet minimum environmental standards and obtain a bond to operate.

The changes came after a $3.9-million settlement nearly two years ago in which car wash owners were accused of cheating their workers out of pay. Now the New York Post is saying that City Council is trying to run all non-union car washes out of business.

“Problem is, car-washing is a lean business. Lots of shops can’t afford either the big bond, or union pay,” the editorial reads. “So the council’s de facto bid to force unionization is more likely to kill these jobs — often among the few open to those with few skills.”

In a city with more than 200 car washes, the new law could deal a big blow, the New York Post says. Proponents say that with 200 businesses at risk of duping their employees, it’s a law that needs to be in place.